Imaging Planes in Radiology

By: Charles H. Mitchell, MD Johns Hopkins Hospital Axial Plane (also called Transverse Plane) The axial plane is the standard imaging plane used in radiology. Data from a CT scans, MRI, and PET images is acquired by the scanner in the axial (or transverse) plane. From this axial data set, multiplanar reformats (MPR) can be generated to view the same information from a different view. As you go through the scanner, images are taken at each point along your body in slices. These slices are combined into one data set that has all of the slices together. This is similar to bread; after being cut...

read more

Head & Neck Cancer

Head and neck cancer is also known as throat cancer, mouth cancer, larynx cancer, squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. By: Charles H. Mitchell, MD Johns Hopkins Hospital What is head and neck cancer? Head and neck cancer is a diverse group of cancers that affects the the upper digestive tract and respiratory tract. This includes cancers of the nasal cavity, lips, gums, tongue, mouth, salivary glands, inside of the cheeks, tonsils, throat (or pharynx), voice box (or larynx), sinuses, ear, and neck lymph nodes. The most common type of head and neck cancer is oral cancer. Risk factors for...

read more

Patient Resource Center

Our patient education center offers information regarding medical imaging, medical conditions, and radiation exposure.

read more

Common Anatomic Compartments

By: Charles H. Mitchell, MD Johns Hopkins Hospital What is an “anatomic compartment”? Anatomic compartments are discrete spaces in the body. They have borders formed by various tissues, including connective tissue, muscle and bone. Anatomic compartments are important, because certain diseases and tumors may occur more frequently in specific anatomic compartments. If you have medical imaging performed, an abnormality may be found in one of these compartments. If surgery is necessary, the compartment will influence how the surgery is performed, since different types of surgical...

read more