What is Radiology?

Radiology developed after the famous discovery of the x-ray by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895, for which he received the Nobel Prize in physics. Over the following century, major advancements in imaging technology gave birth to other types of advanced medical imaging, including computed tomography (CT, or “CAT” scan), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound. The inventors of MRI and CT were also eventual Nobel Prize winners. These technologies save lives every day and have revolutionized the delivery of healthcare. Each is a different lense that the radiologist may use to see inside the human body to pinpoint various disease processes. This allows clinicians to confirm or discover a diagnosis, especially when the patient presents with nonspecific, confusing symptoms.

With increasing complexity and sophistication, radiology gradually developed subspecialties. Without subspecialization, there is simply too much expertise required of any given division of radiology to keep up with the technology and modern best practices. Subspecialty radiologists represent the gold-standard of imaging-based diagnosis that patients should have the right to access conveniently.

Radiologists complete 1 year of internal medicine or surgery internship before starting radiology residency, and typically pursue fellowship subspecialty training after residency in the following areas:

In a confusing medical landscape with non-subspecialty and even non-radiologist imaging interpretations, your radiologist is your key to accurate, reliable diagnosis, and navigating the evolving digital world of healthcare.

  • Neuroradiology (1-2 years)
  • Interventional Neuroradiology (3 years)
  • Interventional Radiology (Body) (1 year)
  • Musculoskeletal Imaging (1 year)
  • Abdominal Imaging (1 year)
  • Chest/Cardiac Imaging (1 year)
  • Breast Imaging (1 year)
  • Nuclear Medicine (1 year)
  • Pediatric Imaging (1 year)
  • Oncologic Imaging (1 year)